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The Johns Hopkins Hospital

Grant and Lakadawala

Service Star winners

How do you use Johns Hopkins Medicine's core values (be the best, be kind, be open, be a role model) to make a difference for our patients? Click on the Leave a Comment box below to inspire us with your story about care that was compassionate, innovative and respectful.

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Doctors’ Day was first observed on March 30, 1933, the anniversary of the first use of general anesthesia in surgery. In 1990, the federal government passed legislation to establish March 30 as National Doctors’ Day. We salute all physicians, especially those supporting patient care at our Johns Hopkins Medicine hospitals. Submit a comment to share what qualities make your doctor exceptional.

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As Easter baskets filled with chocolate bunnies, marshmallow peeps and other treats begin to line store shelves, take a moment to think back to the days when many neighborhoods had a corner store that sold penny candies. Remember Mary Janes, jawbreakers, and the candy necklaces? Submit a comment to share your favorite candy.

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The Federal Drug Administration is proposing changes to food labels to make the calories per serving more clear. How do you use food labels? Take the poll and share a comment. Also, read more at fda.gov about the food label guidelines and see what the new labels will look like.

How Do You Typically Use Food Labels?

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“At work, I have the opportunity to do what I do best every day.” That’s one of the 12 questions Johns Hopkins Medicine uses to measure employee engagement. This week, we want to know how you respond to this important question. Are you able to do your best work every day? Please share your story and tell us why or why not?

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Shivani PatelShivani Patel recently responded to an in-flight medical emergency when a passenger fell ill while 38,000 feet in the air. Read a letter about this anesthesiologist from the grateful patient. Also submit a comment below your own kudos, including those related to service excellence.

Letter from Robert Burns of Melbourne, Fla.

To whom it may concern:

I wish to take this opportunity to highly commend the actions of an outstanding physician on your staff during a recent airline flight from Atlanta to San Francisco.  The flight originated in Orlando, with a brief stopover in Atlanta.

I have been an insulin dependent diabetic for well over 40 years.  I consider myself to be quite conscientious and compliant in dealing with the disease, and I incessantly strive to attain the best possible health.  Unfortunately, during the brief stop in Atlanta, I felt a bit unusual and upon checking my blood sugar level with a meter I carry, I learned it was dangerously low.  I immediately began taking measures to treat the condition by eating candy I was also carrying, however I had already apparently reached the point of no return.

As I later learned, soon after departure from Atlanta my wife summoned a flight attendant for assistance.  Although a crew member immediately provided orange juice and other offerings, I remained unresponsive.  While my wife has had prior first hand experience in dealing with severe hypoglycemic events, her efforts were to no avail.

The flight crew made a plea for medical professionals on board and much to my good fortune, Dr. Patel and another associate professor of anesthesiology headed to the same conference, responded without hesitation, providing the necessary care and treatment.  They administered IV infusion as well as other measures, to which I completely and totally recovered.  In addition, they're highly competent and effective actions prevented any delay or disruption in the flight, which at this point was in serious jeopardy of an emergency diversion to the closest airport.

Dr. Patel's efforts not only immensely aided me, but her calm, kind, confident personality served to relieve the stress and apprehensions of my wife, the flight crew and the other passengers seated around me.  She was an ambassador of compassionate, capable medical care which her colleagues at Johns Hopkins should be most proud of.

My initial reaction upon learning that Dr. Patel is an assistant professor in her field, was awe.  I had apparently been cared for by the best.  Then, as the long flight continued, I couldn't help but wonder when was the last time she actually inserted an IV?  Fortunately for me, that must come under the "like riding a bicycle" umbrella of medicine.

At any rate, thanks to the skilled and professional response by Dr. Patel and her cohort, the flight crew was relieved of virtually all responsibility and concern when it came to me, and thus able to redirect their attention where it should be, the care of their passengers and integrity and safety of the flight as a whole.

Lastly, my wife is tremendously grateful.  While HIPAA may be unheard of under these circumstances in a crowded airliner at 38,000 feet, bedside manner was certainly not lost.  Dr. Patel was always well composed and her caring, compassionate assurances were ever-present.

I feel that Johns Hopkins Hospital should be aware of the caliber of expertise demonstrated here, under most unusual conditions.  I take great comfort in knowing that physicians like Shivani are teaching the next generation of care givers.

Thank you for your time and consideration in reviewing this letter.  It is my sincere hope

that the Johns Hopkins Medicine recognizes and commends Dr. Shivani Patel for the service she provides to your program, as well as all of us "outsiders" and patients who have taken absolute pleasure in our opportunity to meet her.

 

Sincerely grateful,

Robert G. Bums

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The American Stroke Association (ASA), a division of the American Heart Association, reports the following statistics regarding strokes:

  • Stroke is the fourth largest cause of death, ranking behind diseases of the heart, all forms of cancer, and lower respiratory disease.
  • Almost every 40 seconds in the United States, a person experiences a stroke.
  • Over 4 million U.S. adults live today with the effects of a stroke.
  • ASA estimates strokes cost the U.S. $73.7 billion in 2010.
  • Women account for about 6 in 10 stroke deaths.
  • Black males have almost twice the risk of a first-ever stroke compared with white males.
  • Hispanics have an increased risk of stroke compared with non-Hispanic whites.
  • Each year about 795,000 people suffer a new or recurrent stroke in the U.S.
  • Stroke accounts for about 1 out of every 18 deaths in the U.S.

There are more strokes as people live longer because the risk of stroke increases with age.

--From the Johns Hopkins Health Library

 

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Although sleep needs vary from person to person, generally, most healthy adults need no more than of 7 to 9 hours of sleep a night. Take the poll below to share how many hours of sleep do you typically get each day? If you have tips for a good night's rest, please submit a comment.

How Much Sleep Do You Typically Get Each Day?

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Jonathan Lewin, chair of the Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, recently began his term as the new president of the Academy of Radiology Research. The academy is an alliance of 28 professional imaging societies, 37 academic radiology departments, 80 patient advocacy groups, and nine industry partners. Its mission is to raise the profile of imaging research and increase the federal government’s imaging research budget. In addition to its advocacy activities, it organizes and hosts symposia and other programs designed to advance and highlight the role of imaging in innovations in the biomedical sciences.
Dr. Lewin is senior vice president, Integrated Healthcare Delivery, Johns Hopkins Medicine; Martin W. Donner Professor and chair, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine; and radiologist-in-chief, The Johns Hopkins Hospital.

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Are you taking a class to achieve a higher level of proficiency in Microsoft Office? Are you taking lessons to become a better musician or performer? Are you participating in a mentoring program? Have you joined Toastmasters to become a better speaker? Share what you're doing to improve your skills or boost your career.

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