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The Johns Hopkins Hospital

In their heyday, department stores were the shopping destinations of choice for many. Remember when Hecht's had a restaurant and candy counter and Hutzler's had a bakery?  If you're from Baltimore, you may also remember shopping on Lexington Street at Brager Gutman's and "five-and-dime" stores. Share your memories of shopping from back in the day. Which stores do you miss?

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What's the discovery of adrenaline, the "Young Punch," an artificial kidney and the first tissue culture all have in common? They are part of Johns Hopkins' history. Read little-known facts  about Hopkins' physicians and faculty whose research and medical care made a difference.

1897 – John Jacob Abel, the nation’s first full-time pharmacology professor, discovers what he calls “epinephrine,” also now known as adrenalin, a natural substance produced by the adrenal glands. It becomes a crucial, first-line treatment for heart attacks and severe allergic reactions, among other conditions.

1909 – Urologic surgeon Hugh Young invents the “Young Punch” for treating enlarged prostates without resorting to invasive surgery. In 1915, Johns Hopkins’ James Buchanan Brady Urological Institute, the first of its kind associated with a university and teaching hospital, was opened under Young’s leadership, thanks to the philanthropy of James “Diamond Jim” Brady, a multimillionaire railroad equipment magnet on whom Young had used his “Young Punch” to successfully treat for an enlarged prostate in 1912.

1906 – Anatomist Ross Granville Harrison takes spinal cord cells from a frog embryo and a drop of lymph sac fluid to create the first tissue culture. Harrison’s method forms the basis of modern tissue culture technique, a cornerstone of today’s medical research, enabling scientists to study isolated living cells in a controlled environment. It remains the most efficient technique for studying living cells and tissue. Harrison’s student, John Enders, later used Harrison’s method to grow polio virus cultures, leading to the development of the Salk polio vaccine.

1913 – Pharmacologist John Jacob Abel invests the first “artificial kidney” dialysis device. From 1924 to 1927 ,  Abel became the first to purify and crystallize insulin, a key to developing a safe treatment for diabetes.

 

 

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Do you pick up the phone, connect through social media, text or email? During this time of the year when people seem to make an extra effort to renew relationships and reconnect, cast your vote for how you stay in touch with family and friends. Feel free to choose multiple answers.

How Do You Stay Connected With Family and Friends?

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Depression is different from feeling sad or unhappy, and it is not a sign of personal weakness or a condition that can be willed or wished away. The holiday season often brings stress and depression. Read the tips below on how to beat depression. Learn more about depression on hopkinsmedicine.orgor in the Johns Hopkins Health Library.

    Set realistic goals in light of the depression and assume a reasonable amount of responsibility.

    Break large tasks into small ones, set some priorities, and do what you can as you can.

    Try to be with other people and to confide in someone; it is usually better than being alone and secretive.

    Participate in activities that may make you feel better.

    Mild exercise, going to a movie, a ball game, or participating in religious, social, or other activities may help.

    Expect your mood to improve gradually, not immediately. Feeling better takes time.

    It is advisable to postpone important decisions until the depression has lifted. Before deciding to make a significant transition--change jobs, get married or divorced--discuss it with others who know you well and have a more objective view of your situation.

    People rarely "snap out of" a depression. But they can feel a little better day-by-day.

    Remember, positive thinking will replace the negative thinking that is part of the depression and will disappear as your depression responds to treatment.

    Let your family and friends help you.

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As another flu season approaches, we caught up with Debbie Dooley, clinical nurse manager of Johns Hopkins Occupational Health, for details on the mandatory vaccine program at Johns Hopkins Medicine, now in its second year.

Who needs to get the influenza vaccine?
Whether or not they work directly with patients, all Johns Hopkins Hospital and Johns Hopkins Outpatient Center employees are required to receive the annual vaccine. Outside of the East Baltimore campus, all Johns Hopkins Medicine personnel who work in patient care settings must have the vaccine.

How many employees will be vaccinated?
About 50,000 staff members across all Johns Hopkins Medicine entities/hospitals will receive vaccinations this year. Last season’s total was more than 36,000 for the The Johns Hopkins Hospital and other locations in and around Baltimore. More than 95 percent of our clinical staff were vaccinated for flu last season.

Will the nasal mist be available?
Yes, but in limited locations. The nasal mist is a live virus vaccine that requires employees to share confidential medical information before it’s administered. That’s why it’s not provided on hospital units where it’s difficult to protect the privacy of our employees.
If employees are concerned about needles, however, we can do an intradermal right under the skin instead of into the muscle.

Are there any new flu-prevention products this year?
Some people are allergic to eggs, which are used in the production of standard flu vaccinations. FLUBLOK, which we hope to receive late October, does not contain egg products and may be used in those staff members who have egg allergies.

What is the deadline for getting vaccinated?
Employees must receive the vaccination by Tuesday, Dec. 3, 2013.

If you are on the East Baltimore campus, vaccinations are available the following dates and locations:
Church Office Building, 98 N. Broadway, Rm 407
Friday, Nov. 29 from 7:30 a.m. - 4 p.m.
Monday, Dec. 2 from 7:30 a.m. - 4 p.m.
Tuesday, Dec. 3 from 7:30 a.m. - 2 p.m.
Wednesday, Dec. 4 - Friday, Dec. 6 from 7:30 a.m. - 4 p.m.

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Monday, Dec. 2 - Friday, Dec. 6 from 7:30 a.m. - 4 p.m.

For more information, visit hopkinsmedicine.org/mandatory_flu_vaccination/index.html.

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This year, Hanukkah falls on Nov. 28, the same day as Thanksgiving. How will you celebrate the day? Will you be making latkes or playing the dreidel game? Do you plan to enjoy a turkey dinner with the family the take advantage of some early holiday shopping? Or will you be working? Cast your vote on how you’ll spend the day. Leave a comment below to share your plans.

What Are Your Plans for Thanksgiving?

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Do you remember the first time you made a call on a phone that wasn’t a land line? What about the first time you ditched your typewriter for a PC (they were huge)? Did you ever imagine you’d be carrying around a computer (laptop or tablet)? What did you do before the Internet? Take a walk down memory lane and share a humorous or compelling experience of transitioning to a new technology.

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One of the most concerning issues affecting children continues to be bullying, which can lead to low self-esteem, health problems, poor grades and even suicidal thoughts for its young victims. Jami Margolis, LCPC, Johns Hopkins Children’s Center mental health counselor, offers some tips for parents of children who are bullied and are bullies themselves. Interview by Gary Logan.

How common is bullying today?
Bullying is something that has been going on for a very long time and, unfortunately, now it has reached epidemic levels in schools, especially with social media. We usually begin to see cases of bullying in November and December, after kids have settled into their cliques.

Who is the typical victim?
Anyone can be bullied but children who are more prone are those who are socially different, who have lower peer acceptance or who are perceived as weaker. The good news is today kids feel more open about speaking about bullying, but not everybody is willing to do that. Those are the kids we see with depression-like symptoms, who come into clinic where it’s uncovered that they’re getting picked on at school.

What are children feeling when bullied?
They feel deflated and demoralized—their self-esteem has plummeted—and they feel like they can’t tell people. They feel fearful, that if they say or do anything the retaliation will be worse. Interestingly, some of these children become bullies themselves. They feel like this has happened to me and I don’t want to feel like a victim so I will become part of the group. They become aggressive, which leads to suspensions and expulsions and failing grades.

What if the child is bullied via social media?
It’s not like the days when kids said something hurtful and apologized and you shook hands and it was over—there was no social media back then. Now some children and adolescents have horrific experiences that are plastered all over the Internet and Facebook. So not only was the child a victim in his or her personal life, but then he or she has to face the issue publicly and to be harassed about it. People have made attempts on their lives as a result of social media bullying. In those cases parents can press charges because once bullying reaches the airways, it becomes a federal offense. I would encourage parents to make a police report.

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Which Johns Hopkins faculty member had the longest tenure? In what year did the first African-American student graduate from the school of medicine? Learn little-known facts about Johns Hopkins' history.

 

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If you’ve got a headache and vision loss, or are experiencing weight loss and low energy, or have the sniffles with a fever, how do you find out what’s going on with your body?

How Do Your Check Your Symptoms?

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