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Meagan O'Neill

Do you celebrate St. Patrick's Day? Take today's poll to with how you plan to celebrate, and share your favorite traditions in the comments!

How do you celebrate St. Patrick's Day?

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At this week's town meeting at The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Paul B. Rothman, dean of the medical faculty and CEO of Johns Hopkins Medicine, asked attendees what they thought was the most effective way to make Johns Hopkins Medicine a fully integrated medical system. The attendees voted via text, and their results are below.

  • Create and implement JHM-wide systems and processes—46%
  • Better connect JHM member organizations—22%
  • Centralize decision-making power and budgets—12%
  • Clarify leadership objectives—20%

Do you agree with what the poll shows? Share your thoughts in the comments!

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Spring sports were always fun to get out and play after a long winter in the gymnasium. Did you run track, play baseball, or participate in another sport? Share in the comments!

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March is National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month. Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States among cancers that affect both men and women. See how much you know about this serious disease in today’s Trivia Tuesday.

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It has almost been 6 weeks since Phil saw his shadow calling for a longer winter. With the last of the snow (hopefully) behind us, what are you most looking forward to for spring?

What Are You Most Looking Forward to For Spring?

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Alzheimer’s disease, the sixth leading cause of death in the United States, hits close to home for many people, including actor Seth Rogen, who testified at the Senate hearing on Alzheimer’s research last week, to CNN’s Candy Crowley, who will serve as the keynote speaker at the 2014 Alzheimer's Association Advocacy Forum. According to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Alzheimer's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that occurs when nerve cells in the brain die. The disease often results in impaired memory, thinking, and behavior; confusion; restlessness; personality and behavior changes; impaired judgment; impaired communication; inability to follow directions; language deterioration; and impaired thought processes that involve visual and spatial awareness. Take this week’s quiz on Hopkins Happenings to test your knowledge of Alzheimer’s disease.

For more information, visit the Health Library’s section on Alzheimer’s disease.

 

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Have restrictions on resident work hours gone too far, "compressing" intern training time and imperiling the educational mission? That’s the question addressed in the cover story in the latest edition of Hopkins Medicine magazine – The Big Squeeze. Read the article and share your thoughts here.

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This winter has seen a record number of school closings in Baltimore and the suburbs due to snow and wintry weather. For this week’s Throwback Thursday, we invite you to share your favorite memories of what you did on snow days when you were a kid. Did you get together with neighborhood friends and go sledding or have snowball fights? Maybe you built snowmen and snow forts?

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With one in 10 Americans suffering from clinical depression, it’s possible you know someone with this illness. Adam Kaplin, associate professor in the departments of psychiatry and neurology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, outlines six things to avoid saying to someone with depression.

 

1. "I know how you feel." — If you do have experience with depression, it may help to share that a person is not alone, but try to avoid making the conversation completely about you. By saying “That must be difficult,” you are validating that he or she is having a hard time and that the suffering is real.

2. "Suck it up."  — While you may mean well, this can come off as trivializing someone’s condition. Depression is a serious issue in the United States, with approximately 20 million American adults suffering from mood disorders in a given year.

3. "Cheer up." — This, unfortunately, may have the reverse effect and could make them feel worse.

4. "You have to be strong for your kids." — This can be misinterpreted as accusing someone of being a terrible parent, even if you are just trying to offer advice. It might be better to plan an outing for families and keep it as an open invitation, where the person can join if he or she would like.

5. "It's all in your head." — This can be seen as a way of minimizing what the person may be going through. Family and friends need to realize that while they may feel shut out by someone with depression, it is nothing personal.

6. "Just think—there are others who have it worse than you do." — This can be another way of appearing dismissive of a person’s feelings, even if you are trying to recognize them. Sometimes it is more important to be there for a person and let the person know that he or she is not alone.

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This week’s quiz tests your knowledge in a few areas of African-American history. Since 1976, every U.S. president has designated February as African-American History Month, an annual celebration of achievements by African-Americans and a time for recognizing the central role of African-Americans in U.S. history.

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