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Remember Rowan and Martin's Laugh in? The Flip Wilson Show (the devil made me do it) and Carol Burnett? A few more contemporary comedies were In Living Color and Saturday Night Live.  In this week's Throwback Thursday, submit a comment to share which shows made you laugh out loud and your favorite episode.

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Here's some trivia about animals that were mentioned as part of Hopkins' history.

  • What does a Triple Crown winner have to do with neurosurgery at Johns Hopkins ? In 1947, Triple Crown champion Assault, winner of the Kentucky Derby, Preakness and Belmont Stakes, funded a neurology fellowship at Hopkins. A close relative of the horse's owner, Robert Kleberg, had been a patient at Hopkins. A grateful Kleberg donated the winnings.
  • Using a pig, Tony Kalloo, Division of Gastroenterology chief, and a team of gastrointestinal surgeons and biomedical engineers performed the first successful experimental endoscopic suturing of the stomach lining.
  • Vivien Thomas, the lab technician and surgical assistant to Alfred Blalock, contributed to the development of procedures used in the blue baby operation to correct heart defects. He refined his intricate procedures by practicing on hundreds of dogs to re-create the blue baby condition in them and  them fix it. These methods were later safely used in humans.
  • On his first day of work, Thomas assisted Blalock with a surgical experiment on a dog
  • Adolf Meyer, director of the Phipps Psychiatric Clinic from 1921 to 1941, enjoyed hosting dinners at his home and practical jokes. At dinners he and his wife hosted at his home for first year students, he ceremoniously lift the lid from a dome-covered silver platter to reveal a flustered, live turkey.
  • The Department of Art as Applied Medicine created a poster that was sent into space with astronaut Rick Linneman, who trained in Hopkins' then-Division of Comparative Medicine. The poster included the monkeys, mice, dogs, amphibians and other animals that traveled in space.

Source: Leading the Way: A History of Johns Hopkins by Neil Grauer

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What is the most important step in promoting diversity and inclusion among JHM’s leadership and staff

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Are you a twin, one of 20 kids or have a celebrity relative? Do you have a special skill, e.g. scuba diving or a 2nd degree black belt? Do you speak four languages? Submit a comment below to share what people would be surprised to know about you.

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Remember Password, $25,000 Pyramid and The Dating Game? Before Wheel of Fortune and Who Wants to be a Millionaire, there was Hollywood Squares and Concentration. Submit a comment below to share your favorite TV game show.

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Learn about the biggest issues facing men's health.

  • Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among men, excluding skin cancer.
  • African-American men are at the greatest risk to develop prostate cancer.
  • The American Cancer Society recommends men with an average risk of prostate cancer should begin the discussion about screening at age 50, while men with higher risk of prostate cancer should begin earlier.
  • Sexual health is a major overall health marker for men -- 1 in 4 men will experience some form of sexual health concern by age 65.
  • Erectile dysfunction and lower testosterone are linked to larger health risks, including heart disease, high blood pressurediabetes and obesity.

Learn more from our expert, Kevin Billups at at hopkinsmedicine.org/health/. Also visit our health library for more information on men's health.

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Employees who earned their high school diplomas through the GED program offered by the Johns Hopkins Skills Enhancement Program recently participated in a graduation ceremony. Did you or a team member graduate or earn a special recognition? Submit a comment to share the good news. Feel free to post a photo.

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Remember Operation, Barrel of Monkeys and Twister? Post a comment to share the your favorite games from back in the day.

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Whatever healthy change you want to make, it’s not too late to see big benefits. Here are five places to start (and the rewards that could be yours), with inspiration from Argye Hillis, M.D., director of the cerebrovascular division at Johns Hopkins Medicine. Learn more at Johns Hopkins Medicine's Healthy Aging website.

Be active more often.

Exercise lowers your risk of heart disease, type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, and some cancers, and that powerful effect leads to something experts call “compression of morbidity.” It essentially means you stay healthy longer in your late years, as compared with someone who spends the final five or 10 years of life battling chronic illness.

“Exercise is also one of the best things you can do to help prevent dementia and other cognitive changes,” says Hillis. Once you’re cleared by your doctor, aim for at least 30 minutes of physical activity most days of the week.

Improve your diet.

There are all sorts of plans out there to help you lose weight, but it’s not only about dropping pounds. Hillis recommends a Mediterranean-style diet for anyone hoping to avoid dementia as well as minimize other health risks. It’s high in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, olive oil, and fish, and low in meat, sugar and processed foods—all to help your cells function better.

Get quality sleep.

Lack of sleep impacts your memory, emotions, weight and even your appearance. The older you get, the harder it can be to fall and stay asleep, but you still need the same amount of hours.

According to the National Sleep Foundation, most sleep problems are a result of snoring, medication side effects and underlying medical conditions, such as acid reflux, depression and prostate problems. Addressing those issues with your doctor is a good start. You can also enjoy more satisfying sleep by creating a calming space, dedicating enough time for sleep and practicing relaxation techniques.

Stop smoking.

In as little as 24 hours of stopping smoking, there is a decrease in risk of a heart attack. As for longer-term benefits, Johns Hopkins researchers, in conjunction with scientists from other centers, have found that quitting decreased middle-aged smokers’ risk of dying early by almost half. Exercise can help you combat smoking cravings and withdrawal symptoms. Schedule fitness for the time of day you’re most likely to want a cigarette and soon you may be craving a walk or bike ride instead of a smoke. Still struggling on your own? Ask your doctor about smoking-cessation programs and aids.

Challenge your brain.

Whether it’s learning a language or driving a new route to work, your brain loves tackling fresh tasks. Make it a goal to keep learning as you age.

Learn more at Johns Hopkins Medicine's Healthy Aging website.

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Are you doing what it takes to keep the mind and body healthy and look forward to your senior years? Do you fear illness, slowing down physically and mentally, or having no one to take care of you? Or do you just dread the wrinkles? Cast your vote on this week’s Hopkins Happenings’ poll  on what concerns you most about the aging process? Take the poll. Then visit the Healthy Aging website.

What concerns you most about aging?

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