Posts by author:

Stephanie Price

Futurity Today recently published some of the most negative aspects of being a cellphone addict, something that’s becoming all too common today. Check out the biggest offenses and vote on which one(s) you find yourself doing most often.

  • Cellphone “withdrawal” can cause users to suffer from anxiety when they are unable to answer a phone call or messages, or check their phone for any new alerts.
  • Performing work-related activities on your phone after 9 p.m., such as checking emails or scheduling meetings, can make you more tired the following day. The “blue light” emitted by smartphones is one of the biggest triggers that prevent you from getting a good night’s sleep.
  • Sending messages while in meetings is more offensive than you might think. According to a study from the University of Southern California, three out of four people say checking messages during a meeting is unacceptable, and 87 percent say that taking a call is impolite. Men are more likely than women to find phone use during meetings acceptable, and younger professionals are less apt to think twice about using their phone during a meeting compared to their older coworkers.
  • Performing poorly on exams may be linked to phone use in class for nonacademic purposes, regardless of a student’s intellectual abilities, according to studies at Michigan State University.
  • Potentially exposing personal information without knowing it results from your phone doubling as a surveillance tool, tracking data from location-based apps. The more you use your phone, the more you may share about yourself.

Interrupting quality time spent with your partner due to ever-present technology devices is what a doctoral candidate at Pennsylvania State University has coined “technoference.” If your actions imply that you value your phone activity over spending time with your partner, it may negatively affect your relationship.

 

Which one(s) are you most guilty of?

View Results

Polls Archive

Loading ... Loading ...

 

VN:F [1.9.17_1161]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
2 Comments

Did you know as a Johns Hopkins employee you could receive money toward the down payment or closing costs of a home through the Live Near Your Work Program? Learn more about this program offered by the Office of Work, Life and Engagement from Karen Salinas, communications manager from the Office of Work, Life and Engagement, in today’s Hopkins Happenings’ Ask the Expert.

  1. What is the Live Near Your Work program and who is eligible?
    The Live Near Your Work program (LNYW) provides financial assistance to fully-benefited Johns Hopkins University faculty and staff and Johns Hopkins Hospital and Health System employees toward the purchase of homes in specific Baltimore City neighborhoods near Johns Hopkins campuses. For full eligibility details, please review the LNYW program information.
  2. What is the overall goal (or goals) of the program?
    Down payment and settlement costs are one of the biggest barriers to homeownership, especially for first-time home buyers. LNYW strives to assist Johns Hopkins employees with these expenses and to enhance their overall WorkLife satisfaction by providing housing grants in neighborhoods close to their places of employment. The program also intends to strengthen the connections between Johns Hopkins and its surrounding communities.
  3. What are the grant amounts for each target area near the Homewood and East Baltimore campuses?
    Our current grant amounts/locations are found here: web.jhu.edu/lnyw/neighborhoods.
    *Tier A1 (Harwood, Barclay, and Greenmount West) - $23,000.
    *Tier A2 (East Baltimore Development Inc.) - $36,000.
    *Tiers B1 (Remington) and B2 (Better Waverly, and a section of Abell) - $10,000.
    *Tier C (sections of Baltimore Linwood and Baltimore Highland) - $6,000.
    *Tier D Perimeter Areas (within the LNYW footprint but beyond those of the other tiers) - $5,000.
    Our LNYW Neighborhoods web page includes maps of program boundaries and tier areas.
  4. If I’m interested in using a LNYW grant, what steps must I take?
    Interested employees should contact Sandy Jenkins, LNYW program coordinator at sljenkins@jhu.edu or 443-997-7000 prior to begin the search for a new home. It is recommended that you also familiarize yourself with program boundaries, target areas and grant amounts. Visit jhu.edu/lnyw to view this information. Home ownership counseling must be completed before entering a contract of sale.
  5. What are the benefits of urban living?
    Urban living offers considerable advantages especially when you live close to your place of work, including cutting commuting costs and travel time. Through LNYW, Johns Hopkins employees can select from an array of Baltimore’s housing options including historic properties, new construction, free-standing single family houses, row homes and condos. Additionally, convenient access to many cultural amenities such as the arts, entertainment, museums, diverse dining and retail shopping is a significant benefit of urban life. Visit Living in Baltimore for links to several community resources.
  6. Which neighborhoods are hot?
    Over the past 12 months, approximately 75 percent of LNYW grants awarded have been split equally between the A1 and A2 tier areas (Harwood, Barclay, Greenmont West and East Baltimore Development Inc.), likely a result of their high grant amounts, proximity to the Homewood and East Baltimore campuses, and significant residential, commercial, and retail development.
  7. What are residents of LNYW target areas talking about?                                                                                                                                            Residents are talking about restaurants such as Teavolve, the new Henderson-Hopkins School and Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Early Childhood Center.
  8. How many employees have received a LNYW grant?
    Since fiscal year 2009, nearly 400 employees have received LNYW grants totaling over $3,500,000.

 

VN:F [1.9.17_1161]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
2 Comments

It seems there’s an acronym for every person, place and thing at Johns Hopkins. But if you’re the new employee on the unit, or are simply confused by some of the commonly used abbreviations, you may need help deciphering what they all mean. Let’s share some commonly used acronyms in today’s Hopkins Happenings’ Question of the Week to help each other understand the Johns Hopkins “lingo.”

VN:F [1.9.17_1161]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
8 Comments

Corrective eye surgery has become a more accepted option for people looking to improve their vision in the last 20 years. The Johns Hopkins Wilmer Eye Institute is considered a leader in eye care and offers a wide spectrum of vision correction treatments.

Wilmer Eye Institute ophthalmologist and cornea specialist Christina Prescott specializes in medical and surgical management of corneal diseases, laser vision correction and cataracts. Prescott earned her M.D. and Ph.D. from the University of Colorado. After performing her ophthalmology residency at Yale, she completed a fellowship in cornea, refractive surgery and external disease at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary of Harvard University before joining the Wilmer faculty in 2012. In this edition of Ask the Expert, she discusses laser vision treatments and how you can determine if a corrective eye procedure is right for you.

How does someone know if laser vision correction is the right procedure for them?

People pursue laser vision correction for a variety of reasons. Those who have good vision with glasses or contact lenses but have trouble tolerating them are usually great candidates. Others, such as pilots or police officers, may need to improve their vision for professional reasons. Some athletes may choose to improve their vision so they can excel at their chosen sports, such as swimming or martial arts. One woman wanted to be able to see her baby when she woke up in the middle of the night. Many patients tell me after surgery that they love being able to wake up and see their alarm clock. Everyone has his or her own reasons for wanting to see clearly.

Unfortunately, not everyone is a good candidate for refractive surgery; those who do not see well even with glasses or contact lenses are usually not good candidates for refractive surgery. Additionally, there are both medical and ophthalmic contraindications to refractive surgery, which is why it is so important to have a complete ophthalmic exam as part of your refractive surgery evaluation.

What are the main differences between LASIK (laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis) and PRK (photorefractive keratectomy) procedures?

The main difference between LASIK and PRK is the site of the excimer laser treatment. In LASIK, a femtosecond laser—previously, a microkeratome—is used to make a flap. The flap is lifted, and an excimer laser is used to treat the central cornea. The flap is then replaced. In PRK, the epithelium—front layer of tissue covering the cornea—is removed, and the surface is treated with the excimer laser. The epithelium then heals over the treated area. At Wilmer, we offer LASIK, PRK and today’s other advanced surgical technologies for vision correction.

How do you determine the preferred procedure?

A complete ophthalmic exam, including wavefront imaging and topographic mapping of the cornea, is performed. Specific findings on exams or imaging may lead your ophthalmologist to recommend one procedure over another; patient occupation and lifestyle considerations are also important. Ultimately, after a discussion with a surgeon about specific options, patients choose which procedure is right for them.

What is the recovery process like?

The recovery process varies depending on the surgical procedure chosen. One of the reasons for the popularity of LASIK is that there is virtually no pain, and the visual improvement is almost immediate. With PRK, there is some discomfort for three to five days, and the vision can fluctuate for several days to weeks following the surgery. Patients may experience some dry eye symptoms following either procedure, especially if they had problems with dry eye prior to surgery, so use of artificial tears is often recommended.

How long does corrective sight last following the procedure?

Refractive correction is permanent, and the vast majority of patients will enjoy their new vision as long as they do not develop any other ophthalmic pathology, such as cataracts, glaucoma or macular degeneration. Approximately 5 percent of patients, most often patients who had a high refractive error prior to surgery, may experience some regression and may choose to have an enhancement. One unique aspect of refractive surgery at Wilmer is that we include two-year follow-up care, including complimentary enhancements if needed, for all of our patients.

Make an appointment with Prescott by calling 410-893-0480 or by visiting the Wilmer Eye Institute at hopkinsmedicine.org/wilmer/.

VN:F [1.9.17_1161]
Rating: 3.8/5 (16 votes cast)
1 Comment

At the December Johns Hopkins Medicine Town Meeting where the focus was on the education priority of the Johns Hopkins Medicine Strategic Plan, Vice Dean for Education Roy Ziegelstein asked the audience to weigh in on how they learn best through an interactive poll.  Results showed that some work better independently, while others thrive in small working groups and teams. Some students prefer online classes, while others prefer lectures. How do you learn best? Share your answer in today’s Hopkins Happenings’ Cast Your Vote.

How Do You Learn Best?

View Results

Polls Archive

Loading ... Loading ...

VN:F [1.9.17_1161]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
5 Comments

Lillie was recently honored with the Pink Ribbon Award by the Pennsylvania Breast Cancer Coalition, which is given to individuals who demonstrate outstanding leadership in breast cancer research, education, treatment, and advocacy.

Read more through local media coverage of her presentation: http://www.pennlive.com/midstate/index.ssf/2014/10/breast_cancer_pennsylvania_sho.html

VN:F [1.9.17_1161]
Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)
No Comments
Lillie was recently honored with the Pink Ribbon Award by   the Pennsylvania Breast Cancer Coalition, which is given to individuals who   demonstrate outstanding leadership in breast cancer research, education,   treatment, and advocacy.

Read more through local media coverage of her presentation: http://www.pennlive.com/midstate/index.ssf/2014/10/breast_cancer_pennsylvania_sho.html.

VN:F [1.9.17_1161]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
No Comments

Joan KoJoan S. Ko, M.D., urology resident, James Buchanan Brady Urological Institute and Department of Urology, is one of five physicians selected by the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) Research and Education Foundation to participate in the inaugural year of the ABMS Visiting Scholars Program. The one-year, part-time program is designed to support early-career physicians and scientists in their pursuit of research designed to improve patient care and further medical education.

VN:F [1.9.17_1161]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
No Comments

ahmetbaschat2

Ahmet Baschat, M.D., director of the Center for Fetal Therapy and professor in the Johns Hopkins Medicine Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, has been named recipient of the 2014 Haackert Gold Medal, an annual award for lifetime achievements in prenatal medicine.

The award was created by the Drs. Günther and Anemarie Haackert Foundation in Germany. The awardee is selected by an international scientific committee that includes members of the German Society of Obstetricians & Gynecologists, prior recipients and international experts in prenatal medicine. The criteria are based on consistent scientific and educational contributions with measurable impact on prenatal medicine.

Baschat’s areas of clinical expertise include prenatal treatment of intrauterine growth restriction and fetal interventions for twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome, as well as other complications of twin pregnancies.  His research interests include interventions and management techniques for fetal growth restriction and placental insufficiency. He has also done extensive research on the use of high resolution prenatal ultrasound techniques, including Doppler and fetal echocardiography, to predict and detect fetal complications.

Baschat will receive his award on Oct. 10 at the 60th Congress of the German Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology in Munich.

VN:F [1.9.17_1161]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
No Comments

For being a great orientor and a supurb mentor to newly hired and/or transferring nurse in the PACU environment.

VN:F [1.9.17_1161]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
No Comments