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Stephanie Price

Researchers at Johns Hopkins are constantly advancing science through basic, translational and clinical investigations. Many of the world’s greatest discoveries have occurred right here at Johns Hopkins. If you had all of the money and resources at your fingertips, what disease would you focus on curing? Share your thoughts on today’s Hopkins Happenings’ Question of the Week.

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VHS tapesAs technology advances, a few things that we once considered necessities are now obsolete. Do the terms “dial-up Internet” or “movie rental stores” ring any bells? Share the items that we’ve lost to new technology in today's Hopkins Happenings' Throwback Thursday.

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What is the dependent child tuition program?

This benefit provides tuition assistance for unmarried naturally born, legally adopted children or qualified stepchildren under the age of 26 who are primarily dependent upon the eligible parent for financial support.  The dependents must be enrolled full time in an accredited degree-granting college or university. 

Which employees are eligible for this benefit?

All full time JHHSC/JHH employees, which includes: Johns Hopkins Community Physicians, Johns Hopkins Health Care, The Johns Hopkins Hospital and Johns Hopkins Health System Corporation with a minimum of two years of consistent employment that are in good standing and have not been on corrective action within the past 12 months.

What is covered?

Employees are eligible to receive up to 50 percent, less taxes of the dependent child’s full time undergraduate tuition and mandatory academic fees not to exceed 50 percent of Johns Hopkins University’s freshman undergraduate tuition.  You are not eligible to receive tuition support on room, board, books, materials, part-time or graduate studies.

How do employees apply for this benefit?

Apply for this benefit via the online portal no later than 30 days after the start of the semester.  To access the tuition portal, simply log in to https://myjh.edu with your JHED ID and password.  Click on “Staff” and then click “Enrollment”.  At the bottom of the message, click the “I understand and agree button”.   Select tuition from the tabs at the top of the page.  Click on Dependent Child Tuition.  First time applicants must provide a copy of the birth certificate.  The remaining submissions must include a grade report from the prior semester printed from your dependent’s student portal.  This must contain your dependent’s name and the URL (www.mychild’sschool.edu...) of the site from which it was printed.  The following information also must come from the school’s portal and contain the URL: an itemized bill separating the cost of tuition and fees and your dependent’s enrollment schedule detailing the courses and number of credits.   You will also need a system generated tuition confirmation approval form signed by yourself.

What if the URL did not print with the other information when I printed the forms?

Try using a different internet browser (Internet Explorer, Chrome, FireFox, etc.) as the setting in your current browser may be blocking the URL from printing. 

How long does it take to process my application?

It typically takes four to six weeks to process a tuition request.

How can I check to see if my request has been approved?

Log back into the tuition portal to view the status of your application.  If the status is “released to payroll”, your request has been processed.

How do employees receive the benefit reimbursement?

The benefit reimbursement will be itemized on your paycheck. JHHS/JHH does not pay the school directly. It is helpful to remember that this is a taxable benefit, so JHHSC/JHH may report the benefit amount as taxable income and withhold at a higher tax rate from such benefit amount from the employee’s other salary income. 

For more information, or to view the entire policy, please visit www.hopkinsmedicine.org/human_resources/  and click on Benefits, Tuition assistance, view the Dependent Child Tuition Assistance Policy-HR 335, or call 443-997-5400 and select option 4 to speak to a Tuition Benefits Coordinator. 

 

 

 

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One of the goals of the Johns Hopkins Medicine Strategic Plan is to be the national leader in the safety, science, teaching and provision of patient- and family centered care. What do you think is the best way to make a difference for our patients? Perhaps, 24-hour visitation, better billing information or more improved way finding? Share your response in today’s Hopkins Happenings poll and give your thoughts on other ways Johns Hopkins can improve our patient experience.

What’s the best way to improve patient- and family-centered care across JHM?

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LIN_sandra (2)Does it feel like every season is allergy season? Does just the thought of pollen make you sneeze? Sandra Lin, associate professor of otolaryngology-head and neck surgery, gives her expert advice on ways to treat seasonal allergies and her thoughts on what’s next in terms of treating asthma and allergies alike. 

1. What is the worst season for seasonal allergy sufferers?

The worst seasons for a person depends on what that individual is allergic to. However, in my practice, most patients say their worst symptoms are in the spring and fall. These seasons are the worst because of tree pollen and weed allergies, which are common in this part of the country and provoke severe symptoms in many patients.

2. Is it true that the allergy season is lasting longer thanks to the warming trend in our environment?

Some studies link climate change to increasing pollen levels. In addition, some studies suggest greenhouse gases, like carbon dioxide and ozone, can increase allergic response.

3. What are the most effective ways to treat seasonal allergies?

Allergies are treated with avoidance of the allergen and medications. For those that have symptoms despite these treatments, sublingual immunotherapy is an option.

4. Can you talk a little bit more about sublingual immunotherapy?

Immunotherapy treats the cause of allergies by giving small doses of what a person is allergic to, which increases “immunity” or tolerance to the allergen and reduces the allergic symptoms. Unlike injection immunotherapy, which is given as shots in a doctor’s office, sublingual immunotherapy is given at home as drops or tablets under the tongue.

5. Do you have any natural remedies that you suggest?

Saline washes of the nose are helpful in washing out allergens, and many of my patients find them to be helpful.

6. What are your thoughts about the new study that suggests that exposing newborns to more dirt and germs lowers allergy and asthma risk?

This is referred to as the hygiene hypothesis. That is the scientific name for the theory that not enough early exposure to allergens and germs increases chances of allergies and asthma. It’s an interesting idea, but this idea needs more study before we can say that it has been proven.

7. Can you allergy-proof your home?

Allergy-proofing should be directed toward the allergens you are sensitive to.  Allergy testing can be helpful in this regard. If you are allergic to outdoor allergens such as pollen, keeping the windows closed and running the air conditioning can be helpful.  For pet allergies, keeping the pet out of the bedroom and washing the pet frequently can help.  For those with dust mite allergies, HEPA filters, mattress covers and washing bedding can help.

8. What do you think the next important research around allergies and asthma will be?

The next important studies, in my opinion, will focus on how we can prevent allergies and asthma. Some studies have shown the immunotherapy can prevent the development of allergic asthma; if we can identify those children at high risk at a young age, we may be able to really impact their lives by preventing the development of asthma and new allergies.

9. Is there anything else you’d like to add that you think our employees should know?

If you have nasal symptoms that aren’t well controlled with simple treatments, seeing a specialist such as an otolaryngologist (ear, nose, throat) is very important.  It could be allergies sinusitis, or another condition that can be helped by a professional.

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Fourth of JulyFor many, the Fourth of July is not complete without a hot dog, family, friends and fireworks. Do you plan to watch fireworks for the holiday, or do you prefer to avoid the crowds and stay home? Share your plans for the fourth on today’s Hopkins Happenings Cast Your Vote.

What Are Your Plans for the Fourth of July?

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free things in baltimoreThere are so many activities to do in Baltimore and D.C. and we want to hear about them, especially if you’re on a budget. Share your favorite, free thing to do in today’s Hopkins Happenings Question of the Week.

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Moving awayMoving away from home can be one of the best experiences in a person’s life, but it can be tough to leave your family and venture out on your own. For those of you that have left your home, share your story.  Feel free to include what city you moved from and why you were ready to leave on this week’s Hopkins Happenings’ Throwback Thursday.

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