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Workplace violence has become an increasingly concerning topic in the American workforce over the past two decades with results ranging from threats and verbal abuse to physical assaults to homicide. Safe at Hopkins, an online resource that helps educate staff on workplace violence has outlined four steps to help combat any such threats: Recognize, Prevent, Respond and Refer. Visit Safe at Hopkins to learn more on the spectrum of workplace violence and how you can help prevent these actions.

To help better understand workplace violence, Safe at Hopkins has outlined some common myths about workplace violence which should help you better identify such situations should they arise in the future.

Myth 1: Events happen out of the blue

Not true. As attention to workplace violence has grown over the last two decades, experts have largely agreed that responding to the problem requires more than attention to just a physical attack. Homicide and physical violence are on a continuum that also includes domestic/intimate partner violence, stalking, stated threats, bullying, and disrespectful and inappropriate behaviors. When a violent act is displayed by an employee or someone close to an employee, it is likely that a warning sign reached the workplace beforehand in the form of observable behavior.

Myth 2: Workplace violence always involves weapons and is graphic in nature

Not true. Because of the extensive media attention on violence in the workplace and mass shootings, many people mistakenly believe that these sensational events are the only ones that occur. Quite the opposite is true. The majority of incidents that employees and managers must deal with on a daily basis are lesser cases of assaults, domestic/intimate partner violence, stalking, stated threats, harassment, and physical and emotional abuse.

Myth 3: Workplace violence is rare and wouldn’t happen here

Not true. Since the inception of the Risk Assessment Team at Johns Hopkins, there have been situations of disruptive and potentially threatening behavior reported and assessed as part of our commitment to making the Johns Hopkins community safer. As part of this ongoing effort, we are increasing our education and outreach efforts with the goal of identifying and preventing these behaviors earlier.

Myth 4: Someone else is already taking care of the situation; the situation will resolve itself

Not true. Johns Hopkins is committed to providing a safe, healthy, and secure workplace and an environment free from physical violence, threats, bullying, and intimidation. Because of this, and as part of the response to the concerns surrounding workplace violence, policies and procedures have been established to prevent and intervene in situations that pose the potential for violence. However, a critical component of the success of these policies and procedures is awareness. Awareness + Action = Prevention. A guiding principle of awareness is “if you see something, say something."  If you don’t, maybe no one else will.

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September is Fruits and Vegetables More Matters Month – which promotes the importance of having more fruits and vegetables in our everyday diet. Where do you go to pick up produce for you and your family? Do you shop at the nearest grocery store? Do you grow your own? Perhaps, you make a trip during or after work to a local farmer’s market or one at your organization, such as the Johns Hopkins Hospital Farmer’s Market.

Where do you shop for fruits and vegetables?

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Sure, summer vacation season is over. But that doesn’t mean you can’t still daydream about getting away for a while. Do you look forward to visiting Europe, Asia, Africa or somewhere outside of the country? Tell us what country you would like to travel to for a vacation.

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TangoThe new season of many of the popular dancing and entertainment shows kicks off next week, which grants you a perfect excuse to dust off those old dancing shoes and try some of those moves you learned back when.

What’s your favorite classic dance? Can you Tango? Do you prefer to “Twist” with Chubby Checker? Maybe you need a party setting and favor the Electric Slide or Cha-Cha Slide line dances? Let us know what your favorite throwback dance or style of dance is.

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September is prostate cancer awareness month and as the second-most common cancer among American men, prostate cancer has increasingly become a topic on the minds of adult men everywhere. But, prostate cancer is most sucessfully treated when found early and more than 2.5 million men in the US currently are prostate cancer survivors. The five-year survival rate for men diagnosed with prostate tumors discovered at these stages is nearly 100 percent.

H. Ballentine Carter, M.D.

H. Ballentine Carter, M.D.

Johns Hopkins prostate cancer expert H. Ballentine Carter, M.D. provides some answers to a few questions about this disease in this week's Ask The Expert.Q: How can I tell that I, or someone that I know, has prostate cancer?

A: Early prostate cancer may be present without any symptoms. It can often be detected with screening tests.

Q: Should I get my PSA levels checked?

A: PSA testing has become a polarizing topic, with experts insisting the risks outweigh the potential benefits. If you’re between the ages of 55 and 69, are African-American or if you have a family history, speak to your doctor about prostate cancer screening. Only you and your doctor can determine the appropriate course of action based on your health and background.

Q: Can a baldness drug prevent or reduce the incidence of prostate cancer?

A: Finasteride, a baldness drug, has generated buzz after two studies suggested the drug was capable of reducing the incidence of minor prostate cancers. and after reviewing the methodology, I believe the results are overpromising and that finasteride does not appear to be an effective method of prostate cancer prevention.

Q: Where can I find more information?

A: Visit hopkinsmedicine.org/news/stories/september_prostate_cancer_awareness_month.html for more information or visit the Johns Hopkins Health Library for more information about prostate cancer.

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When Walgreen’s opened east of The Johns Hopkins Hospital, it agreed not to sell tobacco products. More recently, a large drug store chain has announced a more health-conscious direction with the most notable change being the elimination of tobacco products in stores effective immediately. Customers will see
nicotine gum and signs urging consumers to stop using tobacco. Take the poll to let us know what you think and share your stories on your attempts to quit or reduce a toabacco habit.

For tips on smoking cessation or facts about smoking and cardiovascular disease, visit the Johns Hopkins health library page at hopkinsmedicine.org/healthlibrary.

Do you think this step by drug stores will lead to a decrease in tobacco use?

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With school in full swing, it’s the time of year when parents feel the renewed pressure of managing personal and professional responsibilities. Those without children can also see their daily schedules fill up during the hectic autumn season. Do you use a lunch break for a walk? Do you fit in a session at the Cooley Center after work? Tell us how you try to stay fit amidst the daily grind.

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Old Cell Phone

It's rumored that some the next wave of smartphones will be announced in the next couple of weeks and we can only imagine the features and gimmicks that will accompany these machines within the next year and beyond. But cellular phones were not always so smart back in the "old days" of even a decade ago. In fact, if you can believe it, at one time all you could do on a cell phone was make a phone call.

Tell us what you remember about your first cell phone. Was it a hulking device similar to that of Saved by the Bell's Zack Morris? Did you play Snake II for hours with your early 2000s device? Do you remember having to pop your antenna out for extra signal? Share your memories!

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