From the category archives:

Cast Your Vote

Two thirds of U.S. adults are overweight or obese and excess body weight does not do the body good. Across the nation, 63 percent of Americans have attempted to lose weight at some point in their lives and 29 percent report they are currently trying to lose weight. (Source: Annals of Internal Medicine)

A recent review of research on 11 popular commercial diet programs found that Jenny Craig and Weight Watchers programs are proven most effective for long-term weight loss, with study participants losing between 3 and 5 percent of their initial weight. Kimberly Gudzune, a Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine researcher, commented that other programs may also achieve such results, but scientific evidence now proves that these two do work to help dieters lose weight and keep it off. Even the 3 to 5 percent of weight loss is an important first step in successfully losing weight.

Have you ever tried a diet program? Cast your vote on which of these popular diet programs have worked best for you.

Which popular diet program has worked for you?

View Results

Polls Archive

Loading ... Loading ...

VN:F [1.9.17_1161]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
12 Comments

During the April 2 Johns Hopkins Medicine Town Meeting, Daniel Ford, vice dean for clinical investigation, shared that even though Johns Hopkins has just as many clinical trials as any other medical institution in the country, only 3 to 4 percent of patients currently being treated at Johns Hopkins are enrolled in a clinical trial. Of the measures Ford mentioned, which do you think will best help enroll more patients in clinical trials? Share your thoughts in today’s poll.

How Can We Enroll More Patients in Clinical Trials?

View Results

Polls Archive

Loading ... Loading ...

VN:F [1.9.17_1161]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
7 Comments

Last week, actress Angelina Jolie announced that she had undergone an elective surgery to remove parts of her reproductive system based on tests suggesting she was at a higher risk for breast and ovarian cancer due to a family history of cancer and recent blood tests that showed she had inherited a gene, BRCA1, that puts her at a higher risk for developing cancer.

Johns Hopkins experts caution that not ever woman who tests positive for this or similar genes that would increase their risk of developing cancer to undergo elective surgery. The Baltimore Sun quoted Johns Hopkins oncologist Kala Visvanathan, who said that such this kind of surgery not only prevents her from bearing any more children, but also sends her into menopause earlier, losing hormones that normally protect against cardiovascular disease, bone loss and cognitive changes.

While Jolie encourages others to "choose what's right for you," the decision is a tough one.

If you found out that you had a gene that puts you at higher risk for developing cancer, would you undergo elective surgery to eliminate cancer in a particular area of the body, or would you let nature run its course? Cast your vote and share your thoughts in today's poll.

What would you do?

View Results

Polls Archive

Loading ... Loading ...

VN:F [1.9.17_1161]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
4 Comments

Huffington Post recently shared the results of the 2015 International Living Annual Global Retirement Index, which looks at eight categories to find the best places in the world to retire. Based on ratings in health care, the five best countries to retire to are:

  1. Malaysia
  2. Costa Rica
  3. Uruguay
  4. Thailand
  5. Panama

Where would you choose to retire based on these ratings? Cast your vote in today’s poll and be sure to check out the full story on huffingtonpost.com to learn more about health care offered in each of these countries.

Where would you retire to get the best health care?

View Results

Polls Archive

Loading ... Loading ...

VN:F [1.9.17_1161]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
4 Comments

Image Source: Wired.com

Image Source: Wired.com

Unsure why #thedress is white and gold for some, and blue and black for others?

Ophthalmologist Neil Miller at the Johns Hopkins Wilmer Eye Institute breaks down the science behind this confusion. His response:

“It has to do with the individual’s color perception. Presumably, their cones –the photoreceptors in the retina—that see the primary colors (red, blue and green) either are functioning differently in different individuals or the information that gets to the area of the brain that interprets that color (V4) is interpreted differently by different individuals."

“What is interesting in either regard is that apparently people see the dress as either black/blue or white/gold –nothing in between. Thus, there must be a very consistent difference between these two groups, whether at the retina level or at the level of the cerebral cortex.”

How do you perceive the dress? Take today’s poll on what color combination(s) you’ve seen, and then let’s put the dress to rest!

What Color is The Dress?

View Results

Polls Archive

Loading ... Loading ...

VN:F [1.9.17_1161]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
7 Comments

How productive do you think you are at work? Do you check off every item on your daily to-do list or are you scrambling to get things done at the end of the day?

According to an infographic produced by software developer Atlassian, the top three culprits of business unproductivity are excessive email, pointless meetings and constant interruptions. These three factors make up for 60 percent or less of work time actually being spent productively. Check out some of these interesting facts:

The average employee…

  • Receives 304 business emails weekly and checks their email 36 times per hour
  • Attends 62 meetings each month, of which 31 hours are considered “pointless” and unproductive
  • Encounters more than 50 daily interruptions and spends two hours each work day recovering from these distractions

Which of these culprits of unproductivity affect you most at work? Cast your vote in today’s poll.

What's your biggest source of unproductivity?

View Results

Polls Archive

Loading ... Loading ...

 

VN:F [1.9.17_1161]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
2 Comments

It can be an uncomfortable subject, but everyone’s time comes one day, so it is best to be prepared for when it does. In light of just how many Americans are unprepared for death, a book, It’s OK to Die, outlines a comprehensive guide of how to make advance preparations. The authors encourage readers to “clear your conscience and settle your affairs long before crisis strikes.”

Are you prepared to die? If so, what steps have you taken to prepare yourself and your loved ones? Read through some of the key steps below (as suggested in the book) and check off which ones you’ve already completed or are working toward. What other important steps have you taken? View the full checklist here.

How Prepared are You to Die?

View Results

Polls Archive

Loading ... Loading ...

VN:F [1.9.17_1161]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
1 Comment

After measles was thought to be eradicated in the United States, an outbreak at Disneyland in California just two months ago has grown to more than 100 cases and brought much attention to the conversation over whether parents should or should not vaccinate their children. What started as a personal choice has even sparked a political debate.

New Jersey Governor Chris Christie mentioned that parents should have “some measure of choice in things,” but later issued a follow-up statement supporting the fact that all children should receive the measles vaccine. Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton tweeted, “The science is clear: The earth is round, the sky is blue, and #vaccineswork. Let’s protect all our kids. #GrandmothersKnowBest.” Even President Barack Obama weighed in on the subject, encouraging all parents to vaccinate their children.

Vice President for Medical Affairs at The Johns Hopkins Hospital Redonda Miller agrees with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that children should be vaccinated. And former Johns Hopkins neurosurgeon Ben Carson agreed that while parents should have the ability to raise children as they see fit, the importance of public health and public safety outweighs the choice to forego safe immunization programs.

What are your thoughts on the situation? Would you recommend that all parents have their children vaccinated, or do you believe that parents should have a choice? Cast your vote and share your opinion in today’s Hopkins Happenings’ Cast Your Vote.

Should All Children be Vaccinated Against Measles?

View Results

Polls Archive

Loading ... Loading ...

VN:F [1.9.17_1161]
Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)
4 Comments

Happy Groundhog Day! Monday, Feb. 2, is the day that Punxsutawney Phil emerges from his hole after a long winter sleep to predict how much longer we will experience cold winter weather. If he sees his shadow, he regards it as an omen of six more weeks of bad winter weather and returns underground. If he doesn’t see it, he takes it as a sign of spring and stays above ground.

With record snowfall and frequent forecasts of “wintry weather” for Phil’s hometown of Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania, what do you predict will happen when he pops his head out this morning?

Cast your vote here in today’s Hopkins Happenings!

Will the Groundhog See His Shadow?

View Results

Polls Archive

Loading ... Loading ...

VN:F [1.9.17_1161]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
1 Comment

Some may think that they can avoid excess sodium by staying away from the salt shaker when cooking or eating. In fact, a great deal of daily sodium intake can be hidden in processed or pre-packaged foods found in the grocery store.

The recommended amount of sodium is 1500 mg per day. Foods with 140 mg or less per serving are considered “low sodium,” while foods with more than 300 mg per serving are considered “high sodium.” How does sodium affect you, you ask? Click here to learn more about how sodium affects you.

In this five-minute video, Johns Hopkins dietician Arielle Rosenberg takes you on a grocery store tour while offering tips to avoid sodium-laden foods. Which of these tips do you practice to avoid excess sodium intake?

 

How Do You Avoid Excess Sodium When Grocery Shopping?

View Results

Polls Archive

Loading ... Loading ...

VN:F [1.9.17_1161]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
1 Comment