What Would You Print with a 3-D Printer?

Trauma surgeon Albert Chi has applied the novel technology of 3-D printers to produce high-tech artificial limbs at a greatly reduced cost to patients. Other 3-D printed items have included shoes, tools, commercial jet parts and even food. If you had access to a 3-D printer, what would you print? Share your thoughts in today’s Question of the Week.

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Elizabeth Rodriguez June 8, 2015 at 2:13 pm

Legos for my kids!

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Farah June 6, 2015 at 11:34 am

If I have a 3D printer, I would like to print custom made, light weight, one of a kind cool frames for eyeglasses. Just add your prescription lenses or shaded lenses.

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Jane Perez June 5, 2015 at 10:34 am

I would be selfish and recreate an authentic Civil War fife.

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laura lees June 5, 2015 at 9:26 am

For our transplant patients we print medication administration charts(grid) with the medication and the various times of administration indicated by an X in the box. At our last pharmacy care transitions subcommittee we discussed our wish list for medication education. Vendors will be coming in to demonstrate their programs. I suggested the ability to print in braille for our patients that are blind. It was noted that access to 3D printers was a limitation. In the past we have sent out our education material to a vendor that could convert it- which was very costly. This is not a common occurence but we transplant blind patients too!

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