Throwback Thursday: Who Was Your Role Model Growing Up?

Role_ModelInspiration is all around us. We can be inspired by stories of people overcoming hardships, or watching people around us make a difference in our communities. Who inspired you when you were growing up? Was it a family member or teacher who pushed you to be better? A public figure with a positive message? Leave a comment and tell us who you looked up to growing up in today's Throwback Thursday.

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Rose Richardson December 17, 2014 at 12:35 pm

One of my favorite role models was my 2nd, 3rd, and 4th grade teacher, Mrs. Ruth Payne. I had her for 3 years and she was one of my most dedicated teachers. She not only promoted me she also promoted all the students in her classes. She never for one moment allowed you to forget that you are special and one of a kind. She helped us to strive for the stars, not just settle for the old adage,"the sky is the limit". With Mrs. Payne there were no limits. Wherever she is I give her many accolades because of her dedication there is no word I cannot pronounce phonetically or spell!!!
Kudos to Mrs. Payne!!!

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Leslie Kennedy November 20, 2014 at 10:38 am

My Dad , he's gone never forgotten. miss you so much .

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Bobbie November 17, 2014 at 12:00 pm

Hands down, my step-mother Mary. She was a retired nurse, She accepted me and my sister hands down unconditionally when she and my father met. She made sure thad Daddy and I had alone time and never pushed herself into our time. She was a kind, gentle soul. I never in 28 years hear her say anything bad about anyone. She would say she would light a candle for someone tho! She taught me a lot about living, living well, and living kind. She taught me how to be gracious in winning and losing. She had a deep faith in God which she emulated every day. She was the neighborhood nurse. She always shared with anyone less fortunate. She was a little Italian woman- all she wanted to do was hug you and feed you. Her family was her life's priority. She was my best friend, confidante, and teacher. I loved her as if she were my own birth mother if not more. I miss her so much but remember what she taught me.

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Cy Governs November 14, 2014 at 11:16 am

The timing of this question is funny: Stephen King, whom I happened to see speak in D.C. on Wednesday night. He's an incredible storyteller, but he's also one of the biggest proponents of reading and writing I've ever encountered.

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Alison Coker November 13, 2014 at 5:03 pm

Like a number of others who commented today about the person who most inspired them, I count my mother, hands down. She was my first and best teacher, the kindest and wisest person in my life. She expected a lot from my brother and me and could be stern when necessary, but she was a ray of light in our lives, a great wife and mother. She loved books and believed in the magic of education. She was wonderful fun to be with and smart in all the important ways. She died of brain cancer on November 6, 1973.
Today I read about the breakthrough that Hopkins' Dr. Quinones-Hinojosa and his colleagues have made in identifying an enzyme key to the survival and spread of glioblastoma cancer cells, my mother's killer. From the bottom of my heart I thank and congratulate these researchers; I always prayed someday someone would find a way to stop this thing in its tracks, and it sounds like that's what's happening. God bless them.

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Denne Jenkins November 13, 2014 at 1:09 pm

My mom was my role model. She was a single mom with 3 children to raise. She raised us all to believe that anything is possible. After 17 years of a single mom, my dad came back into our lives and he and my mom lived happily until death. My mom was a strong woman and taught me to be strong. I have my faith because of my mom. My faith got me through a lot of difficult times, which I thank my mom for. I miss her a lot, as she passed away in December, 2007. There are times I have questions that only she could answer. I love you Mom.

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Lori November 13, 2014 at 11:40 am

My Mom. Jane Fonda until she became Hanoi Jane. Janis Joplin-----until she died.

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C November 13, 2014 at 11:20 am

My most influential and enduring role model is a fictional character. Thank you, screenwriters, for making Captain Jean-Luc Picard a model we can all look up to in so many ways.

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Melinda Thomas November 13, 2014 at 11:18 am

My mom and adopted mom were my role models. My mom who is still alive and battling Parkinson's disease is my rock. She has a strength that is comparable to no other, she has been a humble but loving wife and mother to me and my brothers and sisters. After the death of my dad she held the family together even it was very difficult. Despite her illness she still has a zest for life and love for all seven of her kids.

My adopted mom is a woman I consider a pillar of strength. This quiet and unassuming woman faced many challenges but remained steadfast and persevered. In her short time on earth she became an island scholar, a computer programmer, worked at the IRS, migrated to the United States attended Johns Hopkins University, worked for the Department of Technology, BCPS before she lost her battle with Ovarian cancer in 2000. Both of my moms instilled good christian family values in us. My love for books, crocheting and cooking came from these two. When faced with challenges, I reflect back on both women to find the strength to keep going. I called her Nen, and her love for Joel, Jerlyn and me remains with us every single day. December 27th, marks the fourth year since she passed, it's not easy but the memories keep us together. With such role models, I try to emulate some of their characteristics.

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Geraline coates November 13, 2014 at 10:56 am

My role model was my mother and she continue to be one at an old age of 82. Growing up in the projects at an early age. I watch my mother become a owner of a Beauty Salon and receiving her Masters degree in her profession. When I came from school she had me come to the shop every day. There I gain alot of wisdom, communicating and bussiness skills. She also took me with her to a lot of Out of State hair competion, which some of them she won. She instealed in me leadership ability. Today I still listen to her ideas. As I got older I see were I get some of her artistic ways. Thanks, Mother Grace

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dante goines November 13, 2014 at 10:45 am

MY ROLE MODEL WAS MY MOTHER GEORGIA MAE GOINES RIP WHO PASSED AWAY WHILE FIGHTING BREAST CANCER WHILE IN TAKING CHEMO AND RADIATION AT HOPKINS FOR TWENTY YEARS IN 2001. SHE NOT ONLY WORKED FOR THE STATE GOVERMENT AS A CHILD ABUSE COUNSELOR AND AT HOPKINS WHILE SETTING A STRONG FOUNDATION FOR HER CHILDREN AND GRANDCHILDREN. SHE SHOWED AND TAUGHT ME NO MATTER WHAT LIFE THROWS AT YOU ALWAYS LIVE LIFE TO YOUR FULL POTENTIAL.

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Yvette November 13, 2014 at 9:24 am

Actually for me as a young African American girl, I looked up to Maya Angelou, Angela Davis, Sonja Sanchez and Nikki Giovanni as models for being a black woman in 1970's America. I also liked to write and while I enjoyed Beverly Cleary and C.S. Lewis books, those stories did not reflect my reality at that time. In the case of Angela Davis, I admired the fact that she was a professor and taught and stood up for what she believed was right.

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Elizabeth Rodriguez November 13, 2014 at 8:56 am

This might be a typical answer, but I think the best role mother growning up was my mom. She came from very humble beginings and struggled to get a college degree and later work to support her children by herself. She was a firm believer in education. pushed us hard to be the best we could in everything we did and always found useful things for us to do (and learn) during the summer.

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Judy Baker November 13, 2014 at 8:06 am

When I was 16, I worked at the VA hospital in Ft. Howard. One of the manager's that I worked with had a very positive influence on me. She was very kind, positive, and had great words of wisdom. She encouraged me to go to college and strive to do the best in everything I do. Her name was Lillian Sessoms. I will never forget her.

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